THE CHARACTER OF A FRAME

THE CHARACTER OF A FRAME


Framing my work is an essential part of my process as an artist, for me it is not only finishing the work but also assuring that I stand behind the result. Paintings or drawings that are for me inferior are never framed. It has been a process that evolved and improved over the years. For me a frame has to enhance the graphics but not take away from it, meaning that your eyes have to focus on the subject and not the frame.


In the case of my oil paintings I use all the same shadowbox frames that I craft myself. I like this process because I have full control over the color and size. When I have an exhibition with the paintings they have a uniform presence.


The work that needs protection such as drawings, watercolors or mixed media I usually have  a different approach. I would buy a series of identical forms with glass or plexiglass so to have a coherent exhibit. But lately I have been studying works in  museums, how they are framed and the state of the frame. The case that you seldom notice them means that they meet their purpose. I observed however that a lot of them were dilapidated but in a way that the Japanese would call “kintsugi” (the art of imperfection) and I became intrigued with that vision and so applied this philosophy to my new work. Every work has now a different frame, a frame which I completely transform to fit the particular work and mood of that work. The result has more intimate and mystical qualities and invites the viewer to focus more on the individual works in stead of the whole exhibition.

SIDES, oil on board, with one of the typical frames I use for my paintings.

SIDES, oil on board, with one of the typical frames I use for my paintings.

Constructing a frame.

Constructing a frame.

Cutting the pieces.

Cutting the pieces.

Applying wax.

Applying wax.

Dance, dance. Ink drawing in finished frame.

Dance, dance. Ink drawing in finished frame.

close-up

close-up